Remembering Marquette’s Veterans

In honor of Veteran’s day, I’m posting the section from My Marquette on Marquette’s Veterans Memorial. In addition, two great books about Veterans by U.P. authors are Milly Balzarini’s The Lost Road Home and Loraine Koski’s Elwood’s War, both available at local bookstores.

Marquette's Peace globe and Veterans Walk

From My Marquette         

The number of Marquette’s sons who went to the war are too numerous to mention in full. Each one gave Marquette reason to be proud of its steadfast residents. David McClintock became a submarine commander at the Battle of Leyte Gulf. Otto Hultgren would be wounded three times, yet live to be Marquette’s most decorated hero. Many families made multiple sacrifices: William White would serve with the air force in England, while his brother Roland served in France and Germany, and his brother Frank was stationed in the Pacific. The U.S. Naval Air Base in Illinois was flooded with soldiers from Northern State Teachers College who became known as the “U.P. Wildcats,” after the college’s team name; several accomplished pilots would spring from this group. Michigan’s long winters forged the talents of many in the 10th Mountain Infantry Division, a skiing combat unit sent to the Italian Alps where it would achieve victories at Riva Ridge and Mount Belvedere. So many heroic exploits, too many to tell, but each a reason for gratitude. — The Queen City

            Harlow Park, named for city founder Amos Harlow, is at the edge of what can be considered the downtown area. It has long been a popular playground for children, and for several years, in the 1980s and 1990s, it was the site of the city Christmas tree. In the early twenty-first century, a Veterans memorial was also placed in the park, including a giant lit up peace globe. Since the Veterans memorial only includes the names of people whose family members donated to it, many veterans’ names are missing, but included is a brick for my great-great-uncle Byron McCombie who served in World War I.

Veterans Remembered

            Members of my family have fought in almost every war in United States history, and most of them lived in Marquette. My five-greats-grandfather, Elijah Bishop—father of Marquette pioneer Basil Bishop, fought in the American Revolution as did his father, brothers, and father-in-law. Basil Bishop fought in the War of 1812—he is believed to be the only War of 1812 veteran buried in Marquette. My great-great-great-grandfather, Edmond Remington, his son-in-law, Jerome White, and Jerome’s cousin, Francis Marion Bishop, all served in the Civil War. Just shortly after the Spanish American War, my great-great-uncle, Clement White, served in the Philippines. Besides Byron McCombie, another relative Robert S. Zryd was enlisted in World War I, as were my Grandma White’s brothers William and Daniel Molby. My grandfather’s brothers—Roland, William, and Frank White all fought in World War II. Numerous cousins fought in the later twentieth century wars—Korea, Vietnam, and the Persian Gulf, as well as in Iraq in the twenty-first century.

Tyler's Civil War Ancestors - Sergeant Edmond Remington (top), his daughter Adda (left) and her husband Corporal Jerome White (left)

            Many veterans, my family members included, rest just above Harlow Park in Park Cemetery. Harlow Park is an appropriate place for a memorial to the veterans since it is in the center of Marquette where everyone who drives by can remember the sacrifice these brave souls made that Marquette might be free.

Explore posts in the same categories: Marquette History, Tyler's Family, Tyler's Novels, Upper Michigan Books and Authors, Upper Michigan History, Upper Michigan Sites to Visit

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